Tag: Diane Frolov

I always admired atheists. I think it takes a lot of faith. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, Seoul Mates, 1991

There is nothing sadder in this world than the waste of human potential. The purpose of evolution is to raise us out of the mud, not have us groveling in it. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, Cicely, 1992

I used to think of all the billions of people in the world, and of all those people, how was I going to meet the right ones? The right ones to be my friends, the right one to be my husband. Now I just believe you meet the people you’re supposed to meet. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, The Quest, 1995

I guess what I’m trying to say is, I don’t think you can measure life in terms of years. I think longevity doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with happiness. I mean happiness comes from facing challenges and going out on a limb and taking risks. If you’re not willing to take a risk for something you really care about, you might as well be dead. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, Northern Lights, 1993

A person has three choices in life. You can swim against the tide and get exhausted, or you can tread water and let the tide sweep you away, or you can swim with the tide, and let it take you where it wants you to go. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, Northern Lights, 1993

Marriage. It’s like a cultural hand-rail. It links folks to the past and guides them to the future. —Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure, Our Wedding, 1992

A long time ago, the raven looked down from the sky and saw that the people of the world were living in darkness. The ball of light was kept hidden by a selfish old chief. So the raven turned itself into a spruce needle and floated on the river where the chief’s daughter came for water. She drank the spruce needle. She became pregnant and gave birth to a boy which was the raven in disguise. The baby cried and cried until the chief gave him the ball of light to play with. As soon as he had the light, the raven turned back into himself and carried the light into the sky. From then on, we no longer lived in darkness.
—Diane Frolov, Andrew Schneider, Northern Exposure

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